Displaying items by tag: Developing

DevSecOps evolves DevOps to ensure security remains an essential part of the process.

devsecopsandro.jpg 

DevOps is well-understood in the IT world by now, but it's not flawless. Imagine you have implemented all of the DevOps engineering practices in modern application delivery for a project. You've reached the end of the development pipeline—but a penetration testing team (internal or external) has detected a security flaw and come up with a report. Now you have to re-initiate all of your processes and ask developers to fix the flaw.

This is not terribly tedious in a DevOps-based software development lifecycle (SDLC) system—but it does consume time and affects the delivery schedule. If security were integrated from the start of the SDLC, you might have tracked down the glitch and eliminated it on the go. But pushing security to the end of the development pipeline, as in the above scenario, leads to a longer development lifecycle.

This is the reason for introducing DevSecOps, which consolidates the overall software delivery cycle in an automated way.

In modern DevOps methodologies, where containers are widely used by organizations to host applications, we see greater use of Kubernetes and Istio. However, these tools have their own vulnerabilities. For example, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently completed a Kubernetes security audit that identified several issues. All tools used in the DevOps pipeline need to undergo security checks while running in the pipeline, and DevSecOps pushes admins to monitor the tools' repositories for upgrades and patches.

 

What Is DevSecOps?

Like DevOps, DevSecOps is a mindset or a culture that developers and IT operations teams follow while developing and deploying software applications. It integrates active and automated security audits and penetration testing into agile application development.

 

 

To utilize DevSecOps, you need to:

Introduce the concept of security right from the start of the SDLC to minimize vulnerabilities in software code. Ensure everyone (including developers and IT operations teams) shares responsibility for following security practices in their tasks. Integrate security controls, tools, and processes at the start of the DevOps workflow. These will enable automated security checks at each stage of software delivery. DevOps has always been about including security—as well as quality assurance (QA), database administration, and everyone else—in the dev and release process. However, DevSecOps is an evolution of that process to ensure security is never forgotten as an essential part of the process.

 

Understanding the DevSecOps pipeline

There are different stages in a typical DevOps pipeline; a typical SDLC process includes phases like Plan, Code, Build, Test, Release, and Deploy. In DevSecOps, specific security checks are applied in each phase.

 

Plan: Execute security analysis and create a test plan to determine scenarios for where, how, and when testing will be done.

Code: Deploy linting tools and Git controls to secure passwords and API keys.

Build: While building code for execution, incorporate static application security testing (SAST) tools to track down flaws in code before deploying to production. These tools are specific to programming languages.

Test: Use dynamic application security testing (DAST) tools to test your application while in runtime. These tools can detect errors associated with user authentication, authorization, SQL injection, and API-related endpoints.

Release: Just before releasing the application, employ security analysis tools to perform thorough penetration testing and vulnerability scanning.

Deploy: After completing the above tests in runtime, send a secure build to production for final deployment.

 

DevSecOps tools

Tools are available for every phase of the SDLC. Some are commercial products, but most are open source. In my next article, I will talk more about the tools to use in different stages of the pipeline.

DevSecOps will play a more crucial role as we continue to see an increase in the complexity of enterprise security threats built on modern IT infrastructure. However, the DevSecOps pipeline will need to improve over time, rather than simply relying on implementing all security changes simultaneously. This will eliminate the possibility of backtracking or the failure of application delivery.

 

 BannerFinalGNULINUZROCKS

Published in GNU/Linux Rules!
Wednesday, 09 October 2019 17:25

How to: Developing in the cloud (Eclipse Che IDE)

che cloud.png

 

Eclipse Che offers Java developers an Eclipse IDE in a container-based cloud environment.

 

 

 

In the many, many technical interviews I've gone through in my professional career, I've noticed that I'm rarely asked questions that have definitive answers. Most of the time, I'm asked open-ended questions that do not have an absolutely correct answer but evaluate my prior experiences and how well I can explain things.

One interesting open-ended question that I've been asked several times is:

 

"As you start your first day on a project, what five tools do you install first and why?"

 

There is no single definitely correct answer to this question. But as a programmer who codes, I know the must-have tools that I cannot live without. And as a Java developer, I always include an interactive development environment (IDE)—and my two favorites are Eclipse IDE and IntelliJ IDEA.

 

 

My Java story

When I was a student at the University of Texas at Austin, most of my computer science courses were taught in Java. And as an enterprise developer working for different companies, I have mostly worked with Java to build various enterprise-level applications. So, I know Java, and most of the time I've developed with Eclipse. I have also used the Spring Tools Suite (STS), which is a variation of the Eclipse IDE that is installed with Spring Framework plugins, and IntelliJ, which is not exactly open source, since I prefer its paid edition, but some Java developers favor it due to its faster performance and other fancy features.

Regardless of which IDE you use, installing your own developer IDE presents one common, big problem: "It works on my computer, and I don't know why it doesn't work on your computer."

cohhdhdlin.jpg

 

Because a developer tool like Eclipse can be highly dependent on the runtime environment, library configuration, and operating system, the task of creating a unified sharing environment for everyone can be quite a challenge.

 

But there is a perfect solution to this. We are living in the age of cloud computing, and Eclipse Che provides an open source solution to running an Eclipse-based IDE in a container-based cloud environment.

 

From local development to a cloud environment

I want the benefits of a cloud-based development environment with the familiarity of my local system. That's a difficult balance to find.

When I first heard about Eclipse Che, it looked like the cloud-based development environment I'd been looking for, but I got busy with technology I needed to learn and didn't follow up with it. Then a new project came up that required a remote environment, and I had the perfect excuse to use Che. Although I couldn't fully switch to the cloud-based IDE for my daily work, I saw it as a chance to get more familiar with it.

0_banner.jpg

 

 

Eclipse Che IDE has a lot of excellent features, but what I like most is that it is an open source framework that offers exactly what I want to achieve:

  • Scalable workspaces leveraging the power of cloud
  • Extensible and customizable plugins for different runtimes
  • A seamless onboarding experience to enable smooth collaboration between members

 

Getting started with Eclipse Che

Eclipse Che can be installed on any container-based environment. I run both Code Ready Workspace 1.2 and Eclipse Che 7 on OpenShift, but I've also tried it on top of Minikube and Minishift.

opeenenen.jpg

 

You can also run Che on any container-based environment like OKD, Kubernetes, or Docker. Read the requirement guides to ensure your runtime is compatible with Che:

 

 

For instance, you can quickly install Eclipse Che if you launch OKD locally through Minishift, but make sure to have at least 5GB RAM to have a smooth experience.

There are various ways to install Eclipse Che; I recommend leveraging the Che command-line interface, chectl. Although it is still in an incubator stage, it is my preferred way because it gives multiple configuration and management options. You can also run the installation as an Operator. I decided to go with chectl since I did not want to take on both concepts at the same time. Che's quick-start provides installation steps for many scenarios.

 

Why cloud works best for me

 

Although the local installation of Eclipse Che works, I found the most painless way is to install it on one of the common public cloud vendors.

I like to collaborate with others in my IDE; working collaboratively is essential if you want your application to be something more than a hobby project. And when you are working at a company, there will be enterprise considerations around the application lifecycle of develop, test, and deploy for your application.

Eclipse Che's multi-user capability means each person owns an isolated workspace that does not interfere with others' workspaces, yet team members can still collaborate on application development by working in the same cluster. And if you are considering moving to Eclipse Che for something more than a hobby or testing, the cloud environment's multi-user features will enable a faster development cycle. This includes resource management to ensure resources are allocated to each environment, as well as security considerations like authentication and authorization (or specific needs like OpenID) that are important to maintaining the environment.

Therefore, moving Eclipse Che to the cloud early will be a good choice if your development experience is like mine. By moving to the cloud, you can take advantage of cloud-based scalability and resource flexibility while on the road.

 

Use Che and give back

I really enjoy this new development configuration that enables me to regularly code in the cloud. Open source enables me to do so in an easy way, so it's important for me to consider how to give back. All of Che's components are open source under the Eclipse Public License 2.0 and available on GitHub at the following links:

Consider using Che and giving back—either as a user by filing bug reports or as a developer to help enhance the project.

 

 

 BANNERLINUXFINALESPAOL

Published in GNU/Linux Rules!